What Foods to Eat in Korea When You’re Sick – Page 2 – Seoulistic

What Foods to Eat in Korea When You’re Sick

Source: londonkoreanlinks

YooJacha

YooJaCha or Citron Tea is made by thinly slicing YooJa fruit and combining it with honey or sugar.  It is then preserved in jars and can be taken out from the refrigerator anytime to use.  To prepare scoop a table spoon of the prepared mixture (should be in jelly form), put it into a cup and add hot water.  Kaboom! Easy peasy!

So when do you actually drink this?  This tea is actually beneficial for colds, headaches, and child as it is packed with Vitamin C hence, this can also prevent colds and fatigue in the future! YooJaCha can also bring down fevers, soothe inflammation of throats and coughs,  treat alcohol poisoning and aid digestion.  Drink up everyone, ill or not!

Source: pikeletandpie.com

Source: pikeletandpie.com

 

Yookgaejang

YookgaeJang is spicy beef soup made up of shredded beef, green onions, and other healthy ingredients such as bean sprouts and bracken fern.  Due to the healthy ingredients added and spiciness, it helps clear out your sinuses and cleans your liver, making it a great meal when you have a cold or suffering from a hangover.

Source: maangchi

Source: maangchi

 

Steamed Asian Pears and Honey.

By steaming Asian pears for about 15 minutes you can try adding honey with it and eat it with a spoon.  This simple method can help heal cough and sore throat symptoms rather than suppressing it.  By eating this 2 to 3 times a day you can quickly notice a significant difference in recovery.

 

Source: shinshine

Source: shinshine

 

Maesilcha

Maesilcha is basically Plum Tea made by marinating plums with honey or sugar and is then diluted with cold water.  It is best served chilled during the summer and is often served after a heavy meal.  Despite being a cool refreshing drink, it actually treats stomach aches and aids digestion.  Experiencing serious cases of indigestion and unpleasant toilet trips?  Put the pills away and have a dose of chilled Maesilcha!

Source: koreataste

Source: koreataste


 

Seolleongtang

Seolleongtang is made by simmering parts of bones, head, and meat of an ox for many many many many hours (like literally, a long time).  The milky broth is then served in a bowl with noodles or rice (your preference).  This broth is packed with amino acids and calcium which helps energize the body and aid digestion.  The broth is also very rich in collagen from the bones hence it is also great for your skin.

Source: realcheapeats

Source: realcheapeats

 

Gomtang

Gomtang is made by boiling beef brisket, tripe, entrails, and oxtail for many hours.  Many people struggle distinguishing between Gomtang and Seolleongtang, but Gomtang is more transparent, oily, and more flavourful.  Gomtang is perfect in the Winter when you need to warm up the body, and it is a broth where it gives the body a big energy boost.

Source: hancinema

Source: hancinema

 

Galbitang

Galbitang is a broth made by simmering beef ribs and radish for about 4-5 hours.  Nowadays different variations can be made by adding ginseng, jujube, or pine nuts to add more of medicinal qualities.  Due to high concentrations of amino acids, vitamins, and iron it is widely recognized for its effects of preventing anemia…

..or you can just eat it just for its awesome taste.

Source: maangchi

Source: maangchi

 

Ogokbap

Ogokbap is a bowl of steamed rice containing 5 types of healthy and nutritional grains.  A long time ago Koreans did not eat enough nutritional food during the Winter season as there wasn’t much food available.  To prepare for these problems, Koreans used to prepare dried grains before the winter season to increase the nutritional value of their meals.  Due to its high nutritional value and low calories   it is known as the ‘diet food’ in Korea.  Furthermore it is known to reduce high blood pressure and benefits people suffering from diabetes.

Source: sempio

Source: sempio

 

Do you also have traditional food with medicinal qualities in your country?  What are they?  Let us know in the comments section below!

(Words by Ken Lee of Seoul State of Mind blog ~  Follow his activities here on Facebook and Twitter!)

Ken Lee
Ken Lee
Born and raised in London UK, and currently residing in Korea, Ken Lum Lee is currently an English Teacher at a middle school in Gwangju and the blogger and photographer behind the Korean lifestyle blog Seoul State of Mind. Ken enjoys travelling around Korea, aiming to capture the unique beauties, discover stories and secret hideouts of Korea. Ken can usually be seen with his camera, which is currently the love of his life, and pigging out in Korean BBQ restaurants. Check out his awesome blog: www.seoulstateofmind.com For regular updates, follow him on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram

4 Comments

  1. What’s up mates, how is the whole thing, and what you desire to say regarding this paragraph, in my
    view its actually amazing designed for me.

  2. Rebecca Perez says:

    I really enjoyed reading this post. I, myself have a cold and a sweet love for traditional Korean food. I’m from America and it disturbs me that many Americans, not all, grow up to learn that pills and canned Campbell’s Chicken Noodle Soup is what is going to help treat your sickness. I’m very interested in Eastern medicine and believe that it is a more economical and a naturally substantial way to help heal your body. Americans need to learn from Koreans in the aspect.

  3. Hyemi says:

    Where can I experience and learn about this?

  4. Diabetes is serious enough that I would not treat it with food. I’ve read interesting information about stem cell therapy. The goal of any diabetes treatment plan is to keep blood sugar levels in check and prevent health problems or complications. However, each person has their own individual needs, so you need a different diabetes treatment plan.

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